Dreams of the Future!

The focus of the World Expo is the future. From Shanghai Corporate’s Dream Cube, to Toyota’s robotic violinist, to Saudi Arabia’s $164 million rendition of a “moon boat” that looms in the sky like the most grandiose UFO, the Expo exhibits a plethora or futuristic spectacles.

Saudi Arabia Pavilion

Saudi Arabia Pavilion

Amongst the extravagance, there are of coarse Pavilions with less. Upon visiting the lineless Iraq Pavilion, People in Space artists discovered that the Chinese government paid for and fabricated the majority of the content within the Pavilion. The theme of the Pavilion was not the future of Iraq, but a glorification of “1001 Arabian Nights”. Visitors could consume their very own magic lamps, jewelry, and a Princess Jasmine coloring book. This diversity in visions of the future in relation to history has been a point of interest throughout the development of this project. Is there a shared vision of the future that is able to transcend cultural variance?

Jeffery Byrd asked us to go to the people to collect ideas about the future. He instructed us to ask Expo goers to write a word that they associate with the future on a post it, proudly display it on their forehead, close their eyes, and think of the word as we photograph them. We had every intention of executing this intimate action through a waiting line, but the language barrier created a challenge. Upon asking an Expo volunteer for a proper translation of the phrase “associate with the future”, curiosities were sparked.

The volunteers were so intrigued that they led us into the private area designated for Expo workers so that their colleagues could participate. They even gave us popsicles once we had finished! Check out the visions of the future we collected below.

Fly

Fly

Love

Marriage, Money, & ___

Courage, Marriage, & Money

Freedom

Freedom

Happiness

Happiness

Imagination

Imagination

Happiness

Happiness

Happiness

Happiness

Smile

Smile

Money

Money

Jeffery Byrd is a performance artist who has presented work all over the globe.  His art explores the relationships between reality and artifice. Recent pieces have touched upon ideas related to his day job as a university administrator and have focused on using creative thought to transform the mundane. In this piece, Post-It Notes (usually reserved for the most utilitarian communication) become the vehicle for dreams and desires.

Thus Far, Part 2

More photos from our exhibition “Thus Far”, these ones from the closing event. It felt great to get back to our roots and host a night with a just a few performances, and to utilize the MEME Gallery to officially launch the Present Tense archive.

Philip Fryer

Coco Sgaller

Daniel DeLuca

It’s important to note that the artists body was not present in Daniels piece. Instead, the audience was instructed via a series of cryptic text messages and hidden notes to go to various locations and perform various actions. The final part of the project will come on a later post when it is completed.