Technology Doomed for Obsolescence- Ian Colon @ The Contaminate 2 Festival

We live in a society where technology is evolving to have fewer and fewer wires.  As our technologies become more mobile, they become more integrated into the rhythms of our daily lives.  Deep in The Present Tense Archives, we found a piece that used cords from an obsolete and nostalgic technology  to confront issues around voyeurism, surveillance, and ideas around the post human body.

 

 

Ian Colon “CHASING THE DRAGON”

2007

 

Ian Colon "Chasing the Dragon" 2007

 

For The Present Tense and TEST’s Contaminate 2 Festival, Ian Colon tied a video camera that faced behind him into his hair.  The camera fed into a television that he held inches away from his face.  He began to sprint around the space, navigating the environment only through the lens of the immediate past.  As the piece evolved, Colon increasingly grew disoriented.  His body reached physical fatigue as it tangled in the cords that hung from the television and camera.  This revealed the impossibility of sustaining the action, questioning the complicated relationships that humans of the 21st century have built and continue to build with technology.

 

Ian Colon "Chasing the Dragon" 2007

Farewell to Big Red and Shiny

Last week, Big Red and Shiny, an arts journal that served as a staple in the Boston art scene for the last 6 years, launched their final issue. After providing our community a forum to challenge and create dialogue around the state of the arts in New England, Founder, Matt Nash decided to “close up shop and make way for the next group of motivated artists to build a voice for their community.” Nash points out that Big Red and Shiny had been online a full third of the life of the Internet and lists poignant changes that the Internet has endured through the years. Nash expresses gratitude for the endless art, food, and music blogs that have sifted through content, providing him with the knowledge of “how best to spend the few years I have on this earth”. As I read Nash’s farewell, the worry lines began to subside and I became filled with hope and excitement for the future. In this move to end, Big Red calls upon the creatively minded to meet the challenge of building platforms for one another while simultaneously filtering through the blossoming chaos present in the internet age.

Big Red and Shiny has been crucial to The Present Tense’s evolution. It has been a cheerleader, a source of inspiration, and brain candy for us over the years, publishing interviews about our endeavors, posting our calls, and giving me another platform to publish my writing. In my grieving for the end of one of my favorite Art Journals, I have concluded that it takes courage to end something good to make room for the equally tenacious.

Because the Big Red and Shiny archive is uncertain, check out these Present Tense related posts:

Contaminate 1

Seconds Festival

Contaminate 2

Contaminate 3

Interview with Sandrine & Phil

Revolt2Die @ MEME

Sandrine’s review of The Human Cost of War

Alternative Art Spaces

Sandrine’s Review of X Me Lab