Sweat: Aram Han

 

The word sweat is visceral which has strong connotations of physical work. As a material, sweat has a color and isn’t completely translucent, contrary to popular belief. I became fascinated with using sweat as a natural dye as well as to leave behind an evidence of labor and work.

 

 

Wanting to create an artifact of my own labor, I stitched in black rice into a white collar. After I was done, I steamed the collar with my sweat. The Sweaty Collar then became dirty with both the grayish purple and blue water from the rice and my sweat.

 

 

In 8 Hours of Sweat I collected my sweat for an hour per vial. I tried to catch each bead of sweat that came from my body. I see the volume of sweat as a new way of quantifying work. I stitched black rice into a white collar. After I was done, I steamed the collar with my sweat. The Sweaty Collar then became dirty with both the grayish purple and blue water from the rice and my sweat. These works revolve around the use of sweat in order to talk about labor.

 

 

Aram Han is an artist who uses sculpture, fiber, performance, video, and sound in order to investigate Sisyphean immigrant labor practices. She was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1986. At age 5, Aram and her family immigrated to Modesto, California. She holds her BA in Art and Latin American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. She received her Post- Baccalaureate Certificate in Fine Arts at the Maryland Institute of Art in May 2011. She is currently attending the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to receive her Master of Fine Arts in Fiber and Material Studies.